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Safeguarding- keeping children and adults safe from harm

 

For more information about staying safe, visit the pupils 'staying safe' page too.

Designated Safeguarding Lead - Mrs Andrea Smith ( Head) -

Deputy Safeguarding Leads- Mrs Megan Hammett, Mrs Sarah Salt , Mrs Louise Brown

Safeguarding Governors- Mrs Sally Hutchings

E-safety Lead- Mr Ryan Proctor -

 

Keeping Safe (Safeguarding)  is reinforced to all children throughout the school on a regular basis. It is part of a planned approach to ensure all children are aware how to keep themselves and others safe.

Such activities will include:

People who help us ; Stranger Danger;   Road Safety; Fire safety; Beach Safety; Sun safety; Staying Healthy; Swimming lessons; NSPCC PANTS: NSPCC Share Aware; E-safety; National Anti Bullying week; UNICEF Rights of a child; Sex and Relationships programme; Risk assessing; First Aid certificate 

 

 

 

This section provides parents with a wealth of information about how to support their child with hot topics such as online safety and terrorism. If any parent is concerned about a child's safety they should contact a school safeguarding officer or social care.

~ Keeping children safe is everyone's responsibility~ KSIE 2018

If any parent/carer/ family member or member of our school community  is concerned about a child they should make contact with the Safeguarding Leads in school or contact the social care Gateway on 01752 668000.

 

If any parent has concerns over our procedures, practices or curriculum content, they should come and discuss this with the Headteacher.

NSPCC Assembly guidance and resources parents can access

ICT MARK

 

The development and expansion of the use of ICT / computing, and particularly of the internet, has transformed learning in schools. Children and young people will need to develop high level ICT / computing skills, not only to maximise their potential use as a learning tool, but also to prepare themselves as lifelong learners and for future employment.

 

There is a large body of evidence that recognises the benefits that the use of digital technologies can bring to teaching and learning. Schools have made a significant investment both financially and physically to ensure these technologies are available to all learners, more recently through significant investment in one to one devices.

 

It is important for schools, through their online safety policy and practice, to ensure that they meet their statutory obligations to ensure that children and young people are safe and are protected from potential harm, both within and outside school.

 

Here at St Matthew’s we have worked hard to develop our e-Safety policy and procedures in school to meet the expected standard for accreditation by 360 Safe to gain their ICT Mark. We have met the expected in enough areas to apply for accreditation.

Snapchat

~ primary children shouldn't have this facility However, if they do, parents need to be made aware of new features.

 ‘Snap Map’.

This location based map allows users to see where in the country their Snapchat contacts are, as well as seeing location based photos and videos. The Snap Map shows a user’s Bitmoji, their cartoon avatar within Snapchat, pinpointed on a world map. Users can then zoom into the map to see the exact location of their friends.

How to access Snap Maps

To access the Snap Map in the latest update of the Snapchat app, users need to go to their camera screen within Snapchat and zoom out using two fingers. This will then launch the Snap Maps screen and will allow a user to see their friend’s locations.

Choose who can see your location

It is important to be careful about who you share your location with, as it can allow people to build up a picture of where you live, go to school and spend your time.

Given how specific this new feature is on Snapchat - giving your location to a precise pinpoint on a map - we would encourage users not to share their location, especially with people they don’t know in person.

There are three settings for sharing your location on the map, these are; Ghost mode, My Friends, and Select Friends. But what do these settings mean?

Ghost Mode
Ghost Mode means that you are the only person who can see your location on the map.
Within Ghost Mode you can still see the locations of your friends but they will be unable to see you. This setting will ensure that you have complete control over who knows your location.

My Friends
My Friends means that all of your contacts on Snapchat can see your location. If turning on this setting then it would be important for users to review their Snapchat contacts and also make sure that they never add someone they don’t know in person onto Snapchat.

Select Friends
This setting allows users to look through their friend list and then decide which of their friends they want to be able to view their location. This setting gives users the opportunity to control who can view their location.

Changing settings

When first opening the Snap Map users get to make a decision of who they want to be able to view their location. Once these settings are in place they can always be changed in Snapchat’s settings. This can be done in two ways:

In the Snapchat settings

In the Snapchat screen click on the Settings (cog) icon> click on ‘see my location’ > Choose the setting which suits you

On the Snap Map

Top tips

     Sharing location can be a risky thing to do. Our tips for location sharing are:

  • Only share your location with people you know in person. Never share your location with strangers.
  • Don’t add contacts to Snapchat if you don’t know them in person.
  • Regularly review your settings and take an active decision about whether you want people to know your location. Remember you can switch this off at any time. Think about where you’re sharing your location. Location services such as Snap Maps can lead people to your house. Think about what times you’re on the app and whether these are locations you want to share – if not, then turn this off within your settings.

 

Please visit the below for further advice and guidance:

UK Safer Internet Centre : https://saferinternet.org.uk/blog/introducing-%E2%80%98snap-maps%E2%80%99-new-location-sharing-feature-snapchat

https://techcrunch.com/2017/06/21/snap-map/

http://www.childnet.com/blog/introducing-snap-maps-the-new-location-sharing-feature-in-snapchat

  1. http://www.bbc.co.uk/newsround/40415706

  2.  

E- safety conversation starters

Sign up to this service with NSPCC ( google NSPCC ) and receive weekly emails of conversation starters  you can have with your child.

 

 

 

The 'at home agreement' may support you and your child to ensure only sites you are aware of are being accessed.

TALKING TO CHILDREN ABOUT ACTS OF TERRORISM

 

ADVICE FOR PARENTS

Take time to talk about terrorist attacks.

Children look to their parents for guidance and reassurance. Even if your children are reluctant to talk about it at first, take the lead. What you say matters.

Review what they understand.

As your children continue to deal with terrorist episodes, they may have misconceptions or misunderstandings about what took place, even if they have followed the news accounts. Talk about it in terms they can understand.

Identify your children’s fears.

Children may have unrealistic fears that we do not anticipate. They might fear an attack on their home or loss of their parents. Take time to find out what your children are thinking about and reassure them.

Limit television exposure.

Television news presents highly disturbing images and victim accounts that can be too frightening for most children, particularly those under the age of 12.

Help your children express their feelings about the tragedy.

Share your feelings with your children, but set a good example by expressing your feelings in an appropriate and mature manner. Extreme expressions of anger and grief may not be helpful to your child’s sense of security and self-control.

Express anger in an appropriate manner.

It is understandable that children feel angry, but the target of that anger should be the terrorists. Discourage stereotypes and prejudice which grow so easily from hate and fear. If a British citizen commits an act of terrorism, it does not represent all British citizens.

Spend some family time in normal, reassuring activities.

Bake a cake. Go for a walk. Play a favourite game. Do something together as a family that helps your children feel comfortable and secure.

Advice originally (adjusted for UK context) from http://curry.virginia.edu/research/projects/threat-assessment/talking-to-children-about-terrorism

For Additional Information
National Association of School Psychologists
Purdue Extension: Terrorism and Children
American Academy of Pediatrics – Communicating with Children about Disasters

 

Prevent agenda

 

What is the Prevent strategy?

Prevent is a government strategy designed to stop people becoming terrorists or supporting terrorist or extremist causes.

The Prevent strategy covers all types of terrorism and extremism, including the extreme right wing, violent Islamist groups and other causes.

 

How does the Prevent strategy apply to schools?

From July 2015 all schools (as well as other organisations) have a duty to safeguard children from radicalisation and extremism.

This means we have a responsibility to protect children from extremist and violent views the same way we protect them from drugs or gang violence.

Importantly, we can provide a safe place for pupils to discuss these issues so they better understand how to protect themselves.

 

What does this mean in practice?

 

Many of the things we already do in school to help children become positive, happy members of society also contribute to the Prevent strategy.

These include:

  • Exploring other cultures and religions and promoting diversity
  • Challenging prejudices and racist comments
  • Developing critical thinking skills and a strong, positive self-identity
  • Promoting the spiritual, moral, social and cultural development of pupils, as well as British values

We will also protect children from the risk of radicalisation, for example by using filters on the internet to make sure they can’t access extremist and terrorist material, or by vetting visitors who come into school to work with pupils.

Different schools will carry out the Prevent duty in different ways, depending on the age of the children and the needs of the community.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

How does Prevent relate to British values?

Schools have been required to promote British values since 2014, and this will continue to be part of our response to the Prevent strategy.

British values include:

  • Democracy
  • The rule of law
  • Individual liberty and mutual respect
  • Tolerance of different faiths and beliefs
  •  

Isn’t my child too young to learn about extremism?

 

The Prevent strategy is not just about discussing extremism itself, which may not be appropriate for younger children. It is also about teaching children values such as tolerance and mutual respect.

The school will make sure any discussions are suitable for the age and maturity of the children involved.

 

Is extremism really a risk in our area?

 

Extremism can take many forms, including political, religious and misogynistic extremism. Some of these may be a bigger threat in our area than others.

We will give children the skills to protect them from any extremist views they may encounter, now or later in their lives.

 

Where to go for more information

 

Contact the school

 

If you have any questions or concerns about the Prevent strategy and what it means for your child, please do not hesitate to contact the school.

 

KEY TERMS

 

Extremism – vocal or active opposition to fundamental British values such as democracy, the rule of law and tolerance of different faiths and beliefs

 

Ideology – a set of beliefs

 

Terrorism – a violent action against people or property, designed to create fear and advance a political, religious or ideological cause

 

Radicalisation – the process by which a person comes to support extremism and terrorism

See our policies

 

You will find more details in our safeguarding policy and Anti-Radicalisation policy available on our website, under the Important information section.

We also have information about spiritual, moral, social and cultural development and British values.

13.1.2017 Year 5/6 Learning about Extremism

Year 5/6 were visited by Detective Dave and took part in a workshop to explore their understanding of the words extreme and extremism. We were very impressed by the knowledge gained by the children.

“I learnt that radical means that someone or a group of people have an idea or belief that is different to other people’s beliefs and ideas.”- Tom Yr6

“Extreme can mean different things like extreme sports or if you said, I am extremely cold. An extremist is someone who gets involved in extreme sports or situations. Extremism is when someone gets convinced by someone who is in an extreme situation to be in it too.”- Robert Yr5

These are the PEGI ratings for Computer Games. Have a look at www.pegi.info/ for more information.

 

These are the PEGI ratings for Computer Games. Have a look at www.pegi.info/ for more information.  1

eSense BYTE's - Here at St Matthew's we work towards gaining our eSafety awards. Check out the link below to see the key learning points for each year group.

eSense BYTE's - Here at St Matthew's we work towards gaining our eSafety awards. Check out the link below to see the key learning points for each year group.  1
eSense BYTE's - Here at St Matthew's we work towards gaining our eSafety awards. Check out the link below to see the key learning points for each year group.  2

 

In school we take part in a range of activities and an online quizzes about Staying Safe online . Have a look at the ' thinkyouknow' website for more information on internet safety for pupils and parents.

  • St Matthew's Church of England Primary and Nursery
  • 1 Peregrine Road,Derriford, Plymouth, PL6 5FN
  • Telephone number : 01752 395969
  • Mobile telephone number : 07486954505
  • office@stmatthewsstcmat.org
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